Faculty Strategies for Student Success

  • Utilize DropGuard to report early alerts about students who are not performing well. This triggers outreach from various staff on campus to try to help the student and develop a success plan. The early alert system is not punitive in nature and solely designed to help.
  • Implement elements of Universal Design into your course.
  • Interact with students in and out of class. If you see them in the Student Union, talk to them. Establish rapport and that you care about their success. Create opportunities for interaction about their performance and goals through course activities like individualized check-in meetings.
  • Provide frequent feedback so that students know how they are doing. Assign midterm grades and strive to return graded work as quickly as possible.
  • Encourage students to come to your office with their exams or assignments to discuss them.
  • If you have concerns about a student’s performance or success (for example, missing class), reach out to them personally and offer support. Make individualized referrals to services as needed (such as CSAS, tutoring, counseling) and offer to walk them over and introduce them personally.
  • Learn names and try to show that you remember students—keep a cheat sheet at your podium or your office with notes if needed. Let them know that you see and recognize them.
  • Provide encouragement with personalized feedback.
  • Offer course content and announcements in various formats to engage diverse learning styles.
  • Connect course content to real-life application whenever possible.
  • Build some amount of flexibility into the course for absences for personal, health, and family issues that can arise. Express support for students struggling with life events that can sometimes create academic issues.
  • Express that you are willing to help students during office hours and encourage them to come by.
  • Offer students opportunities to evaluate themselves and think about their goals related to the course, academics in general, and their potential career. Help students identify what they are accomplishing through concrete activities that prompt self-reflection and personal assessment.
  • Approach students with the perception that they can be successful and stress that you believe they can succeed.
  • Offer to provide a training for CSAS tutors who are tutoring students in your class—sharing your expertise and recommendations can make a tremendous difference.
  • Provide review sessions and study guides; offer tutoring with you for small groups that may be struggling.